The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O.The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O. by Neal Stephenson

My rating: 5 of 5 stars


Stephenson goes back to the many worlds theory with a rather different take on it. The world is now devoid of magic because... ah, wait, that might be a spoiler. Quite short by Stephenson's standards at 'only' 700 pages, which might be the influence of the co-author, Nicole Galland. Who I had not heard about but looks interesting and whose work I will be checking out. The usual Stephenson slow build up -but not as slow as in some of his other books. Again, maybe Galland rather than Stephenson. Quite believable characters, for the most part, as well as plot (once you accept the basic premise of the book); the account of the ballooning bureaucracy surrounding the project and the way it operates is quite funny and rings, alas, very true.

I read the whole of this in six days or so, in one go, pretty much. 'Anathem' is still my Stephenson favourite (as is its world), in which I know I am alone but I enjoyed this a lot and will probably read it again at some point.



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The HunterThe Hunter by Chris Carter

My rating: 4 of 5 stars


A short story introducing Robert Hunter, detective, on his first day at LAPD. Brief, very well put together and enjoyable -if the account of a horrible crime, however fictional, can be said to be enjoyable...



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The Caller (Robert Hunter, #8)The Caller by Chris Carter

My rating: 5 of 5 stars


Crime fiction is not normally my thing. This, however, grabbed me from the start -having said this, the first scene is the most horrific fictional murder scene I've ever read, pretty much. It is well written, though; most of the characters are believable and there were very very few moments making me step back with a 'you can't do this' or 's/he wouldn't do that, would s/he?' or making me suspend my... suspension of disbelief. It is very fast paced, never lets go (I'm not a fast reader and read it in five days). There are a few open questions -one, for instance.. why in this sort of novel is the victim always female?
In any case, a very good read if you can get past that horrific first scene. I'll be checking out more of Chris Carter's stuff.



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flaviomatani: (Default)
( Apr. 9th, 2017 11:25 am)
Today I'll be attending the Bibliogoth meeting. There is an FB event for this, here:

https://www.facebook.com/events/664614903749416/

We'll be discussing Kate Morton's 'The Secret Keeper'. My review of this book (as much as it is a review) on Goodreads is here:

The Secret KeeperThe Secret Keeper by Kate Morton

My rating: 4 of 5 stars


I often find it difficult to 'get going' with a book and often find the beginning quite hard going, while I get into the universe of the book and get to know the characters. This didn't happen in this one, I liked it immediately. It did get rather heavy going in the middle -perhaps too much detail about the quest of the modern day protagonist about the incident she witnessed as a child and the life of her mother as a young woman in the London of the Blitz. As it approaches the end it does pick up pace and it did grab me in such a way that I read the last third of the book in one night and one day (I'm not a fast reader). The twist at the end was, for once, truly unexpected, at least for me, although looking back the author had left enough clues. I really liked it.



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